Black “History Museum” to close in the Ozarks

Recently I wrote an article in which I criticized the League of the South and Southern Nationalist News publisher Michael Cushman for their attacks on fellow Southerners who believe that minorities contributed to the Confederate cause.  Cushman and company started an aggressive campaign to label anyone who believes minorities who helped the Confederate cause as “Rainbow Confederates”. My belief is that those who helped the cause of the newly formed Southern nation should be honored for their contribution. I stand by my decision and thought it was time someone stood up to their “bullying”.

Many Southerners simply want their heritage honored but it’s not being honored it is being vilified and destroyed, such as the case of the Museum of the Confederacy being merged with Tredegar Iron Works center ( no doubt a name change is in the works and Confederate won’t be in it).

Of course it is not the only museum closing. The Seattle Post Intelligencer  reports of a Black History Museum closing in the Missouri Ozarks near springfield:

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) — Whether he’s singing the Drinking Gourd Song, donning the neck irons used by a slave before the Civil War or describing the details of the room’s numerous quilts, there is no question that Moses Berry is intimately connected to what surrounds him in the Ozarks Afro-American Heritage Museum in Ash Grove.

The portraits on the walls, after all, are of Berry’s own relatives. The neck iron secured his great-grandfather.

“I think it’s even better than going to the Smithsonian, because it’s so real,” said Osceola resident Laura Reynolds, whose two sons and their friend joined others for a tour on a recent Thursday afternoon.

But tours at the small museum founded in 2002 are numbered. Berry was preparing to close up shop Nov. 15 — he’s 63 now, and the museum is just demanding too much of his time.

“For a one-man show who has other things to do, it’s a lot,” Berry said in an interview at the museum before the tour.

It will be the end of an era for an institution that has managed to attract national attention over the years — a fact that becomes apparent at the start of the tour. While many museums feature videos that provide background for visitors, Berry didn’t have to have one custom-made. He simply shows the segment produced on the museum by National Geographic Today.

The national attention often plays off the museum’s unlikely setting — Ash Grove’s population of 1,430 was 97.4 percent white as of the 2010 census. A story that year in The New York Times referred to Berry as “a one-man racial reconciliation committee.”

I have nothing against the telling of Black History or the History of Slavery for that matter but the part of this story that really irritates me is the following:

A sign-in book in the foyer of the museum has about 1,900 names, which Berry says covers the last five years, though he cautions that a lot of people — particularly groups — don’t sign in. The museum is particularly popular with schoolchildren. About 1,000 kids from Springfield and Willard schools have visited in past Black History Months.

A THOUSAND Southern children were taken to this museum to learn about Black History and Slavery in a time when Confederate flags were taken down from two Missouri State Historic Sites ( one a Confederate cemetery) and in a state that no longer recognizes Confederate History Month. Does anyone see a pattern here?

With all the talk of the hurtful, divisive history of the Confederacy and the pain it caused African-Americans because of its institution of slavery , perhaps the most  bizarre quote from the proprietor of the now closed museum is the following:

The tour veered into philosophy and religion as Berry compared himself to his ancestors. He constantly worries about his adult children, he notes, but his ancestors who were slaves would have had their children sold to another plantation. Although he certainly does not long for a return to the situation his ancestors faced, he said that, in some ways, they were freer than he is today.

What the hell? If Mr. Berry believes his ancestors were more free as slaves than he is today, why is Confederate history being rewritten and erased?

What makes Mr. Berry’s statements even more perplexing is his religious views. A quick investigation would lead one to think Mr. Berry is a Black Supremacist who believes Jesus was born in Africa.

Over two thousand years ago, a young Virgin and her Child found refuge in Africa from threatening forces. Since that time, Christianity has developed extensive roots in Africa. St. Anthony and the Desert Fathers kept the Church from worldliness and preserved the mystical gifts. St. Athanasius helped write the Creed. St. Cyril kept the Church from dishonoring Christ and His Mother. The African Martyrs gave the Church courage

If his biblical history is that inaccurate it makes one question how accurate his Missouri history is and begs the question; Was anything really lost by the closing of his museum?- Editor

About aldermanlacy

I am just an average blue collar American who works hard and tries to be a good dad. I have a passion for history, music and freedom.

One Response to “Black “History Museum” to close in the Ozarks”

  1. Fr. Berry’s words here were fine, Alderman: “A quick investigation would lead one to think Mr. Berry is a Black Supremacist who believes Jesus was born in Africa.

    Over two thousand years ago, a young Virgin and her Child found refuge in Africa from threatening forces. Since that time, Christianity has developed extensive roots in Africa. St. Anthony and the Desert Fathers kept the Church from worldliness and preserved the mystical gifts. St. Athanasius helped write the Creed. St. Cyril kept the Church from dishonoring Christ and His Mother. The African Martyrs gave the Church courage”

    Jesus was born in Bethlehem, and then he took refuge in Egypt in Africa from Herod. If you go back to the gospel narratives, it says that Jesus’ family went to Egypt to escape Herod because God warned Joseph in a dream about this. It’s also true like he says that there were famous saints in Africa- they were in Northern Africa, especially in Egypt.

    Happy Advent.

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