Mandela’s Terrorist Past makes him No George Washington

Freedom fighter, statesman, moral compass and South Africa’s symbol of the struggle against racial oppression.

That was Nelson Mandela, who emerged from prison after 27 years to lead his country out of decades of apartheid.

He died Thursday night at age 95.

His message of forgiveness, not vengeance, inspired the world after he negotiated a peaceful end to segregation and urged forgiveness for the white government that imprisoned him.

That was how CNN described Nelson Mandela in their coverage of his death. While everyone tries to remember the best of a person’s qualities at their time of death, it is important for us to remember the not so flattering aspects of Mandela’s life.

To be blunt, Nelson Mandela was a terrorist who killed men, women and children. South-African missionary Dr. Peter Hammond stated in Christian News Network:

“I wouldn’t generally want to celebrate somebody who made his position in life by blowing people up,” he stated on a recent broadcast. “[H]e plead guilty to 156 acts of public violence and terrorism.”

Hammond outlined that Mandela was the head of the military wing of the African National Committee (ANC), which Hammond also referred to as “the abortion, necklacing and corruption party.” He said that 1,000 Africans were killed by necklacing in the country through the ANC, an act where terrorists would “put an automobile tire over someone, pour petrol over them [and] set them alight.”

Hammond also described numerous other acts of violence that he alleges were committed by the ANC under the order or oversight of Mandela.

“Missionaries and their kids [were] murdered, bayonetted on the fields—whole families killed by landmines planted in the roads,” he said.

The South African missionary stated that Mandela’s wife Winnie also participated in violent acts.

“Winnie Mandela actually was found guilty in court of the murder of a 12-year-old boy,” he explained. “And it was upheld on appeal. She was sentenced to five years in prison, [but] she hasn’t served a day.”

Earlier this year Jonathan Manthorpe of the Vancouver Sun wrote that:

One of the abiding myths of the last 20 years is that when Nelson Mandela became president of South Africa in 1994, he ushered in an era of peace and reconciliation.

Mandela’s charisma and aura of statesmanlike goodness undoubtedly bred a much-needed spirit of hope after a long history of brutal white minority rule.

But real evidence of reconciliation and peace in South Africa is hard to find.

South Africa today remains a country plagued by some of the highest murder, rape and violent crime rates in the world.

Manthorpe goes on to state:

One of the results is a society torn by extreme violence — not the violence of a civil war, but an appalling death rate nonetheless.

There are about 50 murders a day in South Africa, but even this is an improvement over the early years of majority rule when it brushed 70 killings a day.

A study done by the South African government in 2007 found that a culture of violence is deeply embedded in South African society.

Apartheid and the brutal repression of the country’s nearly 80-per-cent majority blacks bears heavy responsibility for this.

But the administrations since 1994 have done little to try to eradicate this culture…

Surveys show that murders and other violent crimes are a major reason for the emigration of hundreds of thousands of South Africans during the last two decades. Some estimates put the number of emigrants as high as three million people, most of them highly qualified whites.

Whites without readily portable skills, such as the country’s farmers, mostly of Afrikaner stock, find themselves trapped in a largely hostile society.

White farmers are a special target in a country where the government has fallen far short of its aim to legally redistribute 30 per cent of white-owned land.

More than 4,000 white farmers and their family members have been murdered since 1994, many of them tortured to death.

So the policy of Mandela to combat injustices against blacks in Apartheid South Africa was to torture and murder and the policy of the post-Apartheid Africa National Congress controlled South-Africa is to torture and murder.
Let’s get one thing straight.  This is Mandela’s real legacy. Every man has a right to be free but to achieve it by the torture and murder of civilians, especially women and children, is and should be considered a war crime. Mandela was no hero, and he sure as hell wasn’t the saint that the press is making him out to be at news of his passing- Editor

About aldermanlacy

I am just an average blue collar American who works hard and tries to be a good dad. I have a passion for history, music and freedom.

2 Responses to “Mandela’s Terrorist Past makes him No George Washington”

  1. Disturbing how some leaders who supposedly claim to stand for liberty and justice are gushing over this guy too. Sure, everyone makes mistakes in their life. But like you said, anyone who glosses over Mandela’s role in killing innocent civilians is in danger of inadvertently telling folks that violence is a solution – which is especially ironic when you hear it coming from a Leftist.

    If you want to see a picture of a true movement of the people to resist tyranny – without hurting anyone – take a look at the White Rose Movement in Nazi Germany. These folks ended up losing their lives at the hands of the State because they passed out pamphlets letting people know about the atrocities the National Socialists (a.k.a. Nazis) were perpetrating on people. If interested, there’s a PDF at the following link that has a pretty nice summary on The White Rose movement: http://missouritenth.com/2011/03/17/the-white-rose-passive-resistance-against-tyranny/

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